Wayne Barlowe – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wayne Douglas Barlowe (born January 6, 1958 in Glen Cove, New York) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer and painter. He has painted over 300 book and magazine covers and illustrations for many major book publishers, as well as Life magazine, Time, and Newsweek. His parents, Sy and Dorothea Barlowe, were both natural history artists. http://ift.tt/1TvpT7k
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Pieter Bruegel the Elder – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://ift.tt/1opnHi4 Pieter Bruegel (also Breughel) the Elder (Dutch: [ˈpitər ˈbrøːɣəl]; c. 1525 – 9 September 1569) was a Netherlandish Renaissance painter and printmaker from Brabant, known for his landscapes and peasant scenes (so called genre painting). He is sometimes referred to as the “Peasant Bruegel”. From 1559, he dropped the ‘h’ from his name and signed his paintings as Bruegel.

Bruegel specialized in genre paintings populated by peasants but he also painted religious works. Making the life and manners of peasants the main focus of a work was rare in painting in Bruegel’s time, and he was a pioneer of the genre painting. His earthy, unsentimental but vivid depiction of the rituals of village life are unique windows on a vanished folk culture, though still characteristic of Belgian life and culture today, and a prime source of iconographic evidence about both physical and social aspects of 16th-century life. For example, his famous painting Flemish Proverbs, originally The Blue Cloak, illustrates dozens of then-contemporary aphorisms, many of which still are in use in current Flemish, French, English and Dutch, and Children’s Games shows the variety of amusements enjoyed by young people. Bruegel’s winter landscapes of 1565 (e.g. The Hunters in the Snow) are taken as corroborative evidence of the severity of winters during the Little Ice Age. http://ift.tt/1opnHi4
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The Host the Ghost the Most Holy-O lyrics

Why, not even a rustler’d have anything to do
with this branded bum steer world
this pirate flag headlong disaster course vessel
misguided charted this nautical numbskull hull
sink in silence smoke – blow your chest out in hope
sits spread-eagle on poor men
piled high on truth mountain – last link in clarity’s chain
you’ll not be thrown but dive and sink
your pockets filled with earthly burdens
when they could be filled with light and back with wings
the sky is dark in daytime
and still the blackbird’s beauty lyrics clean
sing ye brothers and end this miserable thing
and brush the dark sky in light
and let the moon bell crack and ring
upon the mast of mercy
for she is a beautiful thing
I watched her cut with clarity
the sea of Satan’s red rolling water
that stung my eyes with vile vile brine
and clung to the vine that choked Mary’s only Son
God in vain to slaughter
I can’t darken your dark cross door no more
the light lovely one with the nothing door
and oh that pours life water http://ift.tt/1POeGPt
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Jude the Obscure – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jude the Obscure, the last completed of Thomas Hardy’s novels, began as a magazine serial in December 1894 and was first published in book form in 1895. Its protagonist, Jude Fawley, is a working-class young man, a stonemason, who dreams of becoming a scholar. The other main character is his cousin, Sue Bridehead, who is also his central love interest. The novel is concerned in particular with issues of class, education, religion and marriage.

Contents

1 Plot summary
2 Themes
3 Writing
4 Reviews
5 Film, TV, theatrical adaptations, cultural references
6 Notes
7 References
8 External links

Plot summary

The novel tells the story of Jude Fawley, who lives in a village in southern England (part of Thomas Hardy’s fictional Wessex), who yearns to be a scholar at “Christminster”, a city modelled on Oxford. As a youth, Jude teaches himself Classical Greek and Latin in his spare time, while working first in his great-aunt’s bakery, with the hope of entering university. But before he can try to do this the naïve Jude is seduced by Arabella Donn, a rather coarse and superficial local girl who traps him into marriage by pretending to be pregnant. The marriage is a failure, and they separate by mutual agreement, and Arabella later emigrates to Australia, where she enters into a bigamous marriage. By this time, Jude has abandoned his classical studies.

After Arabella leaves him, Jude moves to Christminster and supports himself as a mason while studying alone, hoping to be able to enter the university later. There, he meets and falls in love with his free-spirited cousin, Sue Bridehead. But, shortly after this, Jude introduces Sue to his former schoolteacher, Mr. Phillotson, whom she eventually marries. However, she soon regrets this, because in addition to being in love with Jude, she is physically disgusted by her husband, and, apparently, by sex in general. Sue soon leaves Phillotson for Jude. Because of the scandal Phillotson has to give up his career as a schoolmaster.

Sue and Jude spend some time living together without any sexual relationship, because of Sue’s dislike both of sex and the institution of marriage. Soon after, Arabella reappears and this complicates matters. But Arabella and Jude divorce and she legally marries her bigamous husband, and Sue also is divorced. However, following this, Arabella reveals that she had a child of Jude’s, eight months after they separated, and subsequently sends this child to his father. He is named Jude and nicknamed “Little Father Time” because of his intense seriousness and moroseness.

Jude eventually convinces Sue to sleep with him and, over the years, they have two children together. But Jude and Sue are socially ostracised for living together unmarried, especially after the children are born. Jude’s employers dismiss him because of the illicit relationship, and the family is forced into a nomadic lifestyle, moving from town to town across Wessex seeking employment and housing before eventually returning to Christminster. Their socially-troubled boy, “Little Father Time”, comes to believe that he and his half-siblings are the source of the family’s woes. The morning after their arrival in Christminster, he murders Sue’s two children and commits suicide by hanging. He leaves behind a note that simply reads, “Done because we are too menny.”[1][2] Shortly thereafter, Sue has a miscarriage.
Photochrom of the High Street, 1890–1900

Beside herself with grief and blaming herself for “Little Father Time”‘s actions, Sue turns to the church that she has rebelled against and comes to believe that the children’s deaths were divine retribution for her relationship with Jude. Although horrified at the thought of resuming her marriage with Phillotson, she becomes convinced that, for religious reasons, she should never have left him. Arabella discovers Sue’s feelings and informs Phillotson, who soon proposes they remarry. This results in Sue leaving Jude once again for Phillotson. Jude is devastated and remarries Arabella after she plies him with alcohol to once again trick him into marriage.

After one final, desperate visit to Sue in freezing weather, Jude becomes seriously ill and dies within the year. It is revealed that Sue has grown “staid and worn” with Phillotson. Arabella fails to mourn Jude’s passing, instead setting the stage to ensnare her next suitor.

The events of Jude the Obscure occur over a 19-year period, but no dates are specifically given in the novel.[note 1] Aged 11 at the beginning of the novel, by the time of his death, Jude seems much older than his thirty years, for he has experienced so much disappointment and grief in his total life experience. It would seem that his burdens exceeded his sheer ability to survive, much less to triumph. http://ift.tt/1SjD2Bl
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